Skip to main content

Posts

Blood. Worms. Hello Kitty. Housemaids. And More.

I’ve decided to choose random photos that fascinate me and depict different aspects of life and culture here.
Take this blood stain on my side of the bed.  It’s small and near my shoulders or head.  What does it represent?  Hmmm???  Bed bugs?  Nope.  Mosquitos….yes.  We are blessed.  We have screens on our windows.  Most Papua people do not. Yet random mosquitos still enter our home.  Every time I see blood like this I wonder when I will get malaria next.  Even though we live in a country with a high prevalence of malaria, we have rarely had it.  Our diet, our resources, our knowledge and our prevention all contribute to this fact.  Blessed.  Reminded by blood in the bed.Beetle nut juice.  On the road, and the pavement where people walk.  More offensively when it’s on my car.  The juice is most fascinating when it is being spit out of people’s mouths.  A bright red spew of juice, that still catches me off guard.  Chewed socially and an important part of Papua culture (as it is to 10-20…
Recent posts

Two Second Glances

I still don’t understand why I saw her.  And why I cried.  It was a two second glance, if that.  Allow me to tell you this sweet story of faith and hope and love.
I was returning from town with some of my boys in the car.  I noticed on a certain section of road, leaving town, that my friend’s car was parked.  We know most of our friends and acquaintances by the cars they drive.  As soon as I saw her car, on the opposite side of the road, I began looking for her.  I wasn’t disappointed because I quickly spotted her sitting, Indian style, on the ground by a small fire.  There were a few Papua ladies in the scene also.  Roasting corn.  What struck me was the beauty of my friend.  Her long silver hair.  Her pink blouse.  Her complete contentment and joy.  Her sense of belonging and peace.  And it resonated so deep in my heart that I wept.  A two second peep, if that, and I was still plunging 35-40 mph towards home.  I’m not a crier.  I rapidly wiped my tears away, before a boy would notice…

Forty Six Things

I haven’t always chosen to see this man in the light that I see him now.  My eyes are fully open (at least bigger than they have been) and my heart is in awe.  That I would be so blessed!Join me in wishing Darron an amazing 46th Birthday.I wrote forty six things about his character that make up who he is.  They are in no particular order of importance, but each attribute builds on the other creating the one I am made complete with.FocusedGenerousThoughtfulMission mindedHard WorkerLoves PeopleLoves me (really loves me…ok is just crazy about me)Heart of goldLoves to listen to othersLoves to listen to me (now that takes a man of depth)Loves to make me happyDrivenNot slothfulDeterminedSensitiveA dedicated and attentive FatherDown to earthHonestPassionateHeart after GodDisciplinedDoes not like to be interrupted SupportiveVisionaryAdventurousPeaceableStrong willedBusiness mindedPastoral heartGreat providerFull of integrityDid I already say, Determined?!!!?Knowledgeable bird watcherStudent o…

We Can Never Move “Home” Again

I recognize it as a gift of time.  An awesome privilege.  A Mom’s full cup.  “What was it?”, you may ask.  Too have ALL of our boys home for the holidays. 
Such a treat.  Not all perfect, easy and fantastic.  Yet, deeply good!They, Aubrey and Andrew,  have transitioned.  They’ve made the leap.  From dependent and living at home to independent and living at a University and a boarding high school.  With schedules brimming to maximum capacity, jobs, extra curricular activities and fending for their own personal needs…..they are embracing life.  They returned to Papua changed.  And yet they returned eyes and souls wide open to receive what this land is good at giving.  Beauty.  Tropical awe.  Third world reality. Adventure.  Familiarity.  Friends.  Family. 

And we stood.  Ready to embrace them.  Ready to stand back and let them take it all in and process where they have been and where they are now and where they are going.  And it was good.  It was not all easy.  A Mommy does not like to…

Irreplaceable Value

Crash.  Shatter.  The sweet ornament my three student missionaries had given to us last year had toppled to the tile floor. “Adopted with Love”, with each of their names personally inscribed had not even hung for 5 minutes in the small synthetic tree. The unforgiving tile floor.  Claimer of dozens of glass cups over the years and other pottery/porcelain like items. Usually falls resulting in no second chances.  No redemption.  Most of the time it doesn’t bother me at all.  Other than the risk, mess, and time to clean up countless pieces of shards of glass.  Almost all the homes here in Indonesia are tile at best.  Some are cement, others are dirt and a few are bamboo or other wood.  The tile is cool and easy to clean, but it does not give way to falling glass.Jacob and Nathaniel had decorated for Christmas while Darron and I were away in Australia.  We had left them home alone for 8 days.  Well not really alone, but really.  I mean they had many “Aunts and Uncles” taking them to schoo…

To Medevac. To Not Medevac.

Last year we had a trend going on here in Sentani, Papua.  Every time our expatriate doctor stepped away from being “in town”, we (the nurses) ended up with a critical case in our lap.  Every time.  We threated to not  let our Doctor leave EVER again.  But in all reality, this was not realistic or practical or healthy ……  So she went and we learnt.  Fortunately, that trend seems to have been broken.  However, when our doctor leaves we use the skills and resources that we have, and we proceed to provide care, to the best of our ability.  Fortunately, it doesn’t take a doctor to diagnose “we are in trouble” and “this patient needs hospitalization or a specialist referral”.  Gratefully, we are not an island unto ourselves, as long as the phone and internet are working (one month last year, we had 95% of the time, no internet).  There are doctors with their ears to the ground, and will help give advice.  For this we are indebted and blessed that even though we are alone, we are not alone.…

10 Months too Late. One Month too Early.

If receiving physical mail in your mail box is rare, here in third world no where, it is almost unheard of.  Actually we don’t have a mail box.  We have a P.O. Box, shared by the Aviation campus here.  Us, like you, delight to received hand written notes. They are so meaningful.  Yet we wouldn’t trade instant communication and modern advances.At the beginning of November (2017) I was quite surprised to open this envelope:  Dated: December 6, 2016

What a lovely charming Christmas card.  From. Last. Year.  Yes, it was 10 months too late and one month too early.  THANKYOU Auntie Sonia and Uncle Allan!!!!I actually have been DISAPPOINTED in how few Christmas cards we receive here in the mission field.  Isn’t the point of a Christmas greeting, is to remind people that they are thought of?  In America we would overflow with Christmas cards.  Many of them were handed to us at church by people we saw every week (that kind of humored me also).  Many of them just had the peoples signature on the…