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Shadow of Death

You can probably recite the verse with me, ….”Yay, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death I will fear no evil, for thou art with me, thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.”  This week has been one of walking through the valley of the shadow of death with my Papua friend, Ida.  I have always thought of this verse as pre death, but this week I have taken comfort in these words, in post death. (If you didn’t read last weeks blog here is the link:  http://iwillgoruth.blogspot.co.id/2017/10/anguished-hearts.html)
Every day I have been looking for signs of Jesus comforting her.  I actually have been surprised at the strength Jesus is giving her each day.  Oh……I’m not saying it is easy.  There still has been much weeping, sighing, grief, not understanding, lack of energy, not feeling well, but every day Ida has found hope and strength in Christ.I feel like a cheerleader standing on the sidelines.  Encouraging.  Shouting words to inspire.  Flashing smiles and eye contact.  Wha…
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Anguished Hearts

Image after image flashes through my mind.  I see little but “growing bigger and stronger” two and half year old Azarya coming towards me on the gravel runway.  Wanting to give me a high five and nothing warms my heart more.  Knowing that this is the little boy who drank his way back to life with goats milk.  More images of all over campus this little boy waving at me and smiling shyly, running and playing like normal children should.  Every time I saw him, I rejoiced in the second chance that Jesus had given him.  More images of being with his Mommy and Daddy and their JOY and gratefulness in Ayarya’s strength and change as he transformed before their eyes from being severely malnourished to vibrant.  Ida, his Mommy, is my closest Papua friend, and I see so many images of her and I chatting and laughing together and enjoying her new fat little baby boy, now two months old.  Despite that Ida was still morning the unexpected loss of her father and still mourning the loss of her first c…

Jungle Non Sky Team Members

Imagine the small bush plane landing on the jungle grass airstrip.  Upon landing there are so many things on the pilots mind.  Passengers getting off and all their things.  New passengers jostling for a ticket on.  Limited seats.  Limited weight.  Limited fuel.  Fuel awareness.  Weather awareness.  Time awareness. I’m guessing that there are many more things on a pilots mind.  These are just the obvious things.  On grass airstrips there are no secretaries taking money and selling tickets.  There is no hanger help, fueling the plane or loading the items or calculating the weight.  Nope.  In the middle of the bush, it is up to one man. The pilot.
That is how Simpson’s mother slid onto the plane with her baby.  Oh her presence was noted, but there was too much going on for it all to be processed what her intentions were.  And normally this is not the pilots job, to ask flying sky team members and non members…..”Why, are you flying today?”
It’s not the first time Simpson’s mom has flown h…

One Month Deep

It’s hard to believe that we have been back from furlough a month already.  Though some days it feels like we never left.  Honestly life moves along at a blurring pace.  Darron teases me (and there is much truth mixed in) that even when all our children have flown from the nest, I will still be busy, because I create things to do.  Yep….that’s me.  Guilty as charged!So what do I do?  haha  Even one of my kids, state side….wants to know, what I am doing…..Thus this blog inspiration.  Well let’s just say that everyday in Papua is a kitchen day.  Even with so many less mouths to feed, I still spend at least two hours a day in the kitchen.  That is a light day.  Jacob and Nathaniel are in the “two or three plate” stage per meal.  Which is how my house helper worded it.  Kitchen day only works if there are groceries.  I survive grocery shopping here by doing a once a month BIG grocery shop for all the staples and weekly market shopping for all the fresh veggies and fruits (which are abunda…

Look Over Your Shoulder

As parents we are sometimes not even aware of what we have taught or failed to teach our children.  As our MK’s (missionary kids) transition back to America……some interesting lessons are emerging from growing up in Papua.  One area is driving.  Here we use our mirrors constantly to check what is going on all around us.  Honestly, there is rarely time to look over your shoulder because if you do, you are very likely to miss or rather HIT the numerous things that could have darted out in front of you during that split second glance.  Which include, but are not limited to, pedestrians, goats, motor cycles, children, bicycle riders, dogs, cars, vending wagons, pot holes and I am sure I am forgetting a few things……ahh yes, pigs.So, we were actually humored when one of our transitioning sons, mentioned that his driver test personal kept calling out the inaccurate technique of lane shifting that our MK was using.  Fortunately the license was granted and it was noted that in America there is …

CHICK ICU

Fifty baby chicks.  All in the name of missions.  That’s what I find on my screened in porch last week.  So cute and fluffy.  “Yes, dear, they can stay until they can be flown to Hobotongo.”  I graciously permit.  These chicks will provide eggs for the missionaries and villagers there.  This is where we have a thriving school and a growing church, in a very remote location.  I continue making supper as the chicks settle down in their makeshift box home, thinking, “I don’t have time to mess with chicks, this is Darron’s project.  They can stay here, but I’m not taking care of them.”  Rapidly a few days pass by.  Darron, Jacob and Nathaniel care for the chicks and I enjoy their little chirps and dislike their odor.  Otherwise, I ignore the happenings in Chickville.  Until Wednesday morning.  I am busy at the clinic and Darron keeps sending distressing messages to my phone.  “Chicks are getting sick.  What is going wrong?  What can be done different?”Dr. Di, who loves animal husbandry an…

We HAD to do something DIFFERENT

Furlough is a tricky balance of rest, family and friends, long shopping lists and medical appointments.  Throw in there: fun food, time with family, unspoken expectations, living out of suitcases, saying goodbye to your own flesh and blood after trying to launch them in a two week period and so, so, so, much more.  If I tried to describe it to you: you would probably either really enjoy each word, because you were there or are there OR you would be completely bored.  haha  The latter being more true!The bottom line is often, OK like for the last five furloughs, I have returned back to our field assignment completely frazzled.  HHHMMMM????   What????  Furlough is supposed to equal REST. Something about living with other people for five out of the six weeks, didn’t give me the space and time that my personality needs to process and renew.So last year, Darron and I began talking and recognized that we HAD to do something DIFFERENT.  If we were going to survive.  If we were going to run t…